Markdown Cheatsheet

This is a simple cheatsheet for writing in Markdown. For a more complete reference, the Python-Markdown package refers one to the Markdown Syntax from John Gruber.

Paragraphs and Line Breaks

Paragraphs are one or more consecutive lines of text, separated by one or more blank lines. A blank link will indicate a new paragraph to begin.

If a hard <br /> is desired, simply end the line with two or more spaces. The next line will still be in the same <p> element, but will be hard-wrapped.

The above paragraphs look like this in plain Markdown:

Paragraphs are one or more consecutive lines of text, 
separated by one or more blank lines.
A blank link will indicate a new paragraph to begin.

If a hard `<br />` is desired, 
simply end the line with two or more spaces.
The next line will still be in the same `<p>` element, 
but will be hard-wrapped.

Headers

Markdown uses two styles to denote headers.

Setext-style headers use “underlines” with equal signs (for first-level headers), and dashes (for second level):

This is an H1
=============

This is an H2
-------------

Atx-style headers use from 1-6 hash characters at the start of the line, corresponding to header levels 1-6:

# This is an H1
## This is an H2
#### This is an H4

Blockquotes

Blockquotes use a familiar email-style “>” character for quoting:

> This is a blockquote with some information. If you
> think this needs to be quoted.

This is a blockquote with some information. If you think this needs to be quoted.

Alternatively you can be lazy and only use the “>” character before the first line of a hard-wrapped paragraph:

> This is a blockquote with some information.  If you
think this needs to be quoted, here it is.

This is a blockquote with some information. If you think this needs to be quoted, here it is.

> This is a blockquote with some information.  If you
think this needs to be quoted, here it is. Here is 
a nested quote inside this blockquote:
> > A nested quote inside a previosu blockquote!

This is a blockquote with some information. If you think this needs to be quoted, here it is. Here is a nested quote inside this blockquote:

A nested quote inside a previous blockquote!

> Blockquotes can also have **Markdown** elements
inside them that *will* get parsed.

> ### A Header 3
For all to see.

Blockquotes can also have Markdown elements inside them that will get parsed.

A Header 3

For all to see.

Lists

Ordered and unordered lists are supported.

Unordered lists use asterisks, pluses, and/or hyphens — interchangeably — as markers:

* Red
* Green
+ Blue
  • Red
  • Green
  • Blue

Ordered lists use numbers followed by periods:

1. One Fish
2. Two Fish
3. Red Fish
5. Blue Fish
  1. One Fish
  2. Two Fish
  3. Red Fish
  4. Blue Fish

Notice that the actual numbers are not used in creation of the list! The last element in our example is not a typo - it is a number “5”, not 4.

There can be multiple paragraphs in a list item. Each subsequent paragraph needs to be indented by either 4 spaces or one tab:

1. This is a first list item.

    I should probably make this a little neater in the next item.
    I'll try to make sure things look a little nicer as an example.

2.  This is a second list item
    Just added some extra whitespace in front of this to make it neater
    in the source example.
  1. This is a first list item.

    I should probably make this a little neater in the next item. I’ll try to make sure things look a little nicer as an example.

  2. This is a second list item Just added some extra whitespace in front of this to make it neater in the source example.

Code Blocks

Code blocks will present the text exactly as shown and will automatically convert objects to their corresponding html entity. To create a code block, simply indent every line of the block by 4 spaces or one tab:

This would be a normal pargraph in a document.

    This is indented by 4 spaces and would show up as code.
    This second line would still be part of that code block.

This would be a normal paragraph in a document.

This is indented by 4 spaces and would show up as code.
This second line would still be part of that code block.

With the Python-Markdown extensions, you can also include an explicit declaration of the type of code for highlighting. Begin the code block with three colons followed by the language to highlight as:

    :::html
    <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1" />

Which will yield:

<head>
<meta charset="utf-8" />
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1" />

Horizontal Rule

A horizontal rule tag <hr /> can be inserted by simply using three or more hyphens, asterisks, or underscores on a line by themselves:

* * *
***
*********
- - -
---
_________

Any of those will insert the horizontal rule at that location:


Markdown offers two styles of links: inline and reference.

The link text is enclosed by [square brackets].

Inline links use parenthesis immediately after the closing square bracket to contain the link URL, and an optional title:

This will [link to pixls.us](https://pixls.us "A Link to pixls.us").

This will link to pixls.us.

You can use relative paths while on the same site:

A link back to the [Meta page](/about/meta/).
A link back to the [Meta page](../meta/).

A link back to the Meta page.
A link back to the Meta page.

Reference-style links use a second set of square brackets with a self-chosen label to identify the link:

This is another link to [pixls][1]

Then anywhere in the document you can define the link label on it’s own line:

[1]: https://pixls.us "An Optional Title for the Link"

Link definition names can contain any numbers, letters, spaces, or punctuation and are not case-sensitive:

[link text][a]
[link text][A]

are equivalent links.

There is also an implicit link name shortcut that lets you use the link text itself as the identifier. Use a second set of empty square brackets after the initial link text:

[Google][]

Where the link can then be identified elsewhere as:

[Google]: http://www.google.com

Emphasis

Asterisks (*) and underscores (_) are used as indicators of emphasis. Text wrapped in on asterisk or underscore will be wrapped with an HTML <em> element. Double asterisks or underscores will be wrapped with an HTML <strong> tag:

*single asterisk*
_single underscore_
**double asterisks**
__double underscores__

outputs:

<em>single asterisk</em>
<em>single underscore</em>
<strong>double asterisks**
<strong>double underscores</strong>

or:

single asterisk
single underscore
double asterisks
double underscores

Code

An inline span of code uses the backtick quote (`) to offset it from surrounding text.

You can use the `printf()` function.

produces:

You can use the printf() function.

A shortcut for creating links to URLs and email addresses can be used where the address is wrapped in angle brackets:

<https://pixls.us>

Which will be turned into an html link of the address text:

<a href="https://pixls.us">https://pixls.us</a>

https://pixls.us